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"Imagine, just for a moment, if you went to a party of strangers and the very way in which people discussed life — love, politics, art — was surprising! And you were invited to have your own strange perspective! 

So why do I enjoy — desire — this critical will?

Because it is a will to see the world differently, to shed habit and cliche and engage the world as it emerges, as something to reckon rather than something to be known, mastered, and confirmed.

Because being an individual means being different and being different means seeing the world from your own perspective — and expressing that difference.

Because life is more beautiful and exciting and lively when you don’t know what’s going to happen, when you invite questions not just about the most hallowed truth but about the least likely ones, as well — those truths you didn’t even know were truths you could question.

Oh, to be critical is to be alive, to affirm the flux of life. And what is sexier than that?”

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flawlessescape:

The evolution of street art is amazing.

1. ~ Magne

2. Wall in Palestine

(via thepeacefulterrorist)

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wewhowander:

Street art of Sean Hart

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Street Art by Sean Hart

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jmchicago:

street geology / architectural strata / our own Grand CanyonChicago haiku no. 90 | January 2012

jmchicago:

street geology / architectural strata / our own Grand Canyon
Chicago haiku no. 90 | January 2012

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"Truth exists; Only lies are invented"

— Georges Braque (via kimborg)

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Please respect urban solitude.
Please respect urban solitude.

(Source: thewhatever, via theydonotmove)

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"Creativity is, in a nutshell, a bit crazy - and most crazy people are too disorganized to do much. But geniuses require to be a bit crazy, yet also do prolonged focused work - and this is a reason why there are so few of them.

So - high intelligence is very rare (and some societies have too low an average intelligence to generate more than a tiny proportion of very intelligent people).

Within this tiny group of highly intelligent people, on top of all this, to get the coincidence of a creative way of thinking with a sufficiently persevering personality type is very rare.

And among this small percentage of a small percentage, there are the workings of sheer luck, there is the higher than normal risk of (self) sabotage by mental illness and addiction, there are the problems of a higher than usual probability of an abrasive or antisocial personality - and (as Murray identifies) the likelihood that for a person to aim very high requires a belief in transcendental values (the beautiful, the truth, virtue) - and that some societies (such as our own) lack this belief.

Put all these together and it is clear why in all societies genius is rare; and why genius is completely absent from most societies."

— Bruce Charlton, Why Genius Is So Rare

(Source: nextbigfuture.com, via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

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crashinglybeautiful:

“Who writes the great books? It isn’t we who sign our names. What is an artist? He’s a man who has antennae, who knows how to hook up to the currents which are in the atmosphere, in the cosmos; he merely has the facility for hooking on, as it were. Who is original? Everything that we are doing, everything that we think, exists already, and we are only intermediaries, that’s all, who make use of what is in the air. Why do ideas, why do great scientific discoveries often occur in different parts of the world at the same time? The same is true of the elements that go to make up a poem or a great novel or any work of art. They are already in the air, they have not been given voice, that’s all. They need the man, the interpreter, to bring them forth.”
—Henry Miller, The Art of Fiction No. 28
Photo Credit Henri Cartier-BressonThanks to theparisreview.

crashinglybeautiful:

“Who writes the great books? It isn’t we who sign our names. What is an artist? He’s a man who has antennae, who knows how to hook up to the currents which are in the atmosphere, in the cosmos; he merely has the facility for hooking on, as it were. Who is original? Everything that we are doing, everything that we think, exists already, and we are only intermediaries, that’s all, who make use of what is in the air. Why do ideas, why do great scientific discoveries often occur in different parts of the world at the same time? The same is true of the elements that go to make up a poem or a great novel or any work of art. They are already in the air, they have not been given voice, that’s all. They need the man, the interpreter, to bring them forth.”

Henry Miller, The Art of Fiction No. 28

Photo Credit Henri Cartier-Bresson
Thanks to theparisreview.

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humansofnewyork:

“I’ve won a few acting awards, but as with all art, it’s an endless journey.”“What do you mean?”“You never get to the bottom of an art. There’s always another layer of depth. Whether that be painting, or acting, or photography. Ten different people could photograph that tree right there, and there would be a different spirit beneath each of those photographs.”“I think I’ll put that as your caption.”“Oh c’mon. That’s nothing new. Everyone knows that.”“Maybe so. But ten different people could explain that, and it’d be different every time.”

humansofnewyork:

“I’ve won a few acting awards, but as with all art, it’s an endless journey.”
“What do you mean?”
“You never get to the bottom of an art. There’s always another layer of depth. Whether that be painting, or acting, or photography. Ten different people could photograph that tree right there, and there would be a different spirit beneath each of those photographs.”
“I think I’ll put that as your caption.”
“Oh c’mon. That’s nothing new. Everyone knows that.”
“Maybe so. But ten different people could explain that, and it’d be different every time.”

(Source: humansofnewyork)

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"I want to be with those who know secret things
or else alone."

— Rainer Maria Rilke, from A Book for the Hours of Prayer, trans. Robert Bly (via proustitute)

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